Tag Archives: Duck Face

From Duck Face to Kylie Jenner: Selfie Standards of Beauty

A few months ago, my best friend sent me a link to an article: “NTSB: Selfies Led to Fatal Colorado Plane Crash.”

And I texted back: False. Stupidity Led to Fatal Colorado Plane Crash.

Framing strikes again.

There is a fine line between the desire to document and sheer stupidity, but there shouldn’t have to be. In theory, common sense should be more common, but it’s as one of my professors once said: Everyone assumes common sense is an equal playing field, where we all have equal and similar stocks of meaning.  And for some, the stock of meaning is apparently one of doing whatever it takes to look like a celebrity.

Lately, the biggest selfie fad blowing up social media is one shrouded in idiocy (along with complex societal constructions): The Kylie Jenner Challenge.

downloadIf you’re not familiar, the Kylie Jenner Challenge involves sucking as hard and long as you can on a shot glass, water bottle, etc., to temporarily augment one’s lips and mimic Kylie Jenner’s recently, permanently plumped, pouty mouth. Jenner’s new look took the internet and tabloid spheres by storm a few weeks ago, and now, the #KylieJennerChallenge has gone viral.

I’m not going to pretend what these teens are doing isn’t idiotic. It is. But the reason that this hashtag has taken off isn’t necessarily because these girls succeed in looking like Kim Kardashian’s little sister. But the medium of the selfie is once again taking the flack with articles saying, “No surprise selfies are causing teens to want to look perfect as well” (ABC Action News). It’s not the selfie causing teens to want to look perfect. It’s unrealistic standards of Western beauty. CC_mbWlUUAAOxeW

American culture is obsessed with celebrities, and with the development of social media we have all become micro-celebrities in our own right. We are the star of our own lives, constantly putting on performances on social media to appear a certain way. We even fuel the fire of rumors and gossip that way – case and point, last weekend, I ran into an old ex from years ago (it did not end well), and later, he posted a FB status that inevitably stirred up interest among old acquaintances. My cell phone immediately started blowing up with texts: “Did you run into So-and-So? What happened?”

Mirco-celebrity. In our own right. Even when we don’t want it.

That’s what the Kylie Jenner Challenge does. Not only does it play on our culture’s obsessions with actual models, actors, rappers, etc., it inspires individuals to be the celebrity at the center of their own network. By mimicking a celebrity, one becomes a (small) celebrity themselves. Young girls are so obsessed with Jenner’s unrealistic standards of beauty that they’re willing to permanently harm their own bodies to temporarily achieve such status. Yes, the selfie is the way they join the conversation, but the selfie is not to blame. I would point the finger at unrealistic body standards, celebrity-obsessed culture, and teenager stupidity (which we’ve all done in high school) before blaming the medium of the selfie.

CDEQlbRUMAAfhZZBut as I mentioned, these teens really aren’t succeeding with emulating Jenner’s look. If anything, the reason the challenge has become such a craze is because of how badly it has gone. Instead of touting their newly inflated lips, teens are posting pictures of their faces and chins covered in bruises. They’ve become micro-celebrities because of their distress – a concept that makes a lot of sense when you think about tabloids and shows like TMZ.

In mirco-celebrity culture, even failures are celebrated. Instead of achieving Jenner’s look, the conversation is really more about how impossible it is to do so. These teens are posting pictures of their bruised and bloodied faces and laughing at themselves. I’m not saying that makes it better; I’m saying it’s a fascinating look into what we value in celebrities and what we value in ourselves. Idealized (and unrealistic) versions of celebrity bodies promote others to try to look that way, even when it’s impossible.

The Kylie Jenner Challenge is just the latest mold of beauty standards in our digital culture. The one that has prevailed the longest is arguably the Duck Face, which has been frequently hailed as “stupid” and “attention seeking.” However, instead of thinking about what Duck Face is, we should think about what Duck Face does (same with the #KylieJennerChallenge). It narrows the face, makes the lips appear fuller, the eyes wider, the cheekbones more prominent. It temporarily molds the face to adhere to American standards of beauty, the standards frequently put forth by celebrities. We fetishize macro-celebrities for that look, but as soon as a micro-celebrity joins in, the sexist discourse surrounding the selfie rears its head once more.duck-face

From the duck face to the #KylieJennerChallenge, all these facial expressions and experiments are the result of feminine control. Girls are constantly bombarded with unrealistic images and told to look a certain way, but as soon as they try to achieve it, they are criticized.

That being said, girls, please stop being stupid and put down the shot glasses. Even Kylie Jenner didn’t achieve that look naturally. Take all the selfies you’d like, but leave the shot glasses alone. I promise you’re beautiful just the way you are.

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